Everyday is Mother’s Day

I know I just wrote something about Mother’s Day facts, but I want to extend this a little further. You see, for me, that day is just another holiday. It’s a holiday for our special and beloved mothers, sure, but how is that different from every day? It doesn’t take one Sunday a year to show your mom you care.

My friends are always puzzled why I don’t do anything overtly special for Mother’s Day, aside from the call and small gifts here and there. It is because I try to make most days that special day. To be honest, I’m not close to my mother. She’s really piling on the years and getting senile, causing quite an annoyance sometimes. I still love her though, and she knows it. And I show it. Love is all she has left in her life now.

My kids also learned that lesson. They love their mother, no matter how far away they are, and they call and email at least once a week. Mother’s Day is just an excuse for them to visit. They also visit at other times, too. It makes me happy that they still care for us. I must have done something right.

Mother’s Day isn’t that special. Every single day is much more.

5 Interesting Facts About Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day has come and gone! I made sure it was a special day for my dearest, even though I couldn’t take her to the resort she likes this year. The kids came to visit too, so it was a wonderful day for us all. To celebrate this special holiday for mothers everywhere, I’ve compiled these little tidbits about this special occasion!

1. There are at least 30 dates for Mother’s Day! The one we Americans know is on the second Sunday of May (May 11 this year), which is also the most common date it’s celebrated. March 8 is the next most common, which is mostly celebrated in some parts of Asia and Europe. British and Irish people celebrate Mothering Sunday on the fourth Sunday of Lent, which is March 2 this year. Indonesia has theirs on December 22! If you forget the date there, at least you can claim your Christmas present is also for Mother’s Day!

2. Mongolia celebrates Mother’s Day twice! March 8 marks International Women’s Day in this country, which is treated like Mother’s Day. June 1 sees Mothers and Children’s Day, which is also celebrated! It’s the only country which celebrates this occasion twice. The moms there must be quite happy with all the attention!

3. Anna Marie Jarvis is the woman responsible for Mother’s Day in America. When her mother died on May 9, 1905, she devoted her time to making Mother’s Day a holiday for mothers everywhere. Her mother was an advocate of the holiday, joining campaigns for peace, worker’s safety and health, ever since the Civil War ended. It was first celebrated in 1907, with only a few people. In 1908, it was 407 children and their mothers. The holiday became official in 1910, and a proclamation from President Woodrow Wilson came in 1914. By then it had finally turned into the holiday to appreciate mothers, not just for peace.

4. Mothering Sunday is deeply rooted in the church. It was originally a mass held in one’s mother church on the fourth Sunday of Lent. Families gathered at such days, and mothers and children were often reunited for one day of the year. Later, it became the day that servants would be allowed to visit their mothers. Today, it is interchangeable with Mother’s Day. It was also called Simnel Sunday, Rose Sunday and Refreshment Sunday before, due to certain traditions on the day. Talk about a deep history!

5. Ancient Greeks and Romans also celebrated Mother’s Day! Although it wasn’t called that specifically, the two peoples celebrated dates related to their gods. Greeks honored Cybele, great mother of the Greek gods, at a date around mid-March. Romans had a holiday called Matronalia, dedicated to Juno. At the same time, mothers got gifts on that day.

Pretty interesting, hm? Mother’s Day is a holiday rooted within our society, as appreciation to those hardworking women who gave birth and took care of us. Did you give your mom a present this year? If not, at least give her a call!